World Wide Military
Your prime source for information of more than 700 International Weapon systems
Professionals in International Military Aircraft and Helicopters
Military Aircraft Military Helicopters Army Material Navy Ships Weapon Systems Countries
Home

Aviation Technology
Aircraft Systems
Weapon Systems

Defence Industry
About WWM
Military Aircraft-->Aircraft Systems-->F414
F414 Turbofan

The F414-GE-400 turbofan engine with afterburner has been developed by the American company General Electric on the basic of the F404. It was specially developed for the new 2-engine F/A-18E/F Super Hornet fighter jet for the United States Navy. The F414 is the successor of the F404 engine which is basically used on the Hornet.

For the upgrade from F404 to the F414 the air inlets on the aircraft have been enlarged because the F414 requires more airflow (16% more airflow is sucked by the fan and 5% more by the first 3 rotor steps of the compressor).
 

Development
Originally the engine was designated as Growth II+ but changed in to F414-GE-400 in 1991. It can deliver a thrust of 22,000 pounds on sea level during ISO conditions. In 1992, GE was awarded with a contract of the US Navy for the delivery of 13 engines for ground tests and 21 engines for flight tests. The first F414 production engines was delivered at the end of 1998 after completing the Engineering and Manufacturing Development program. General Electric will deliver the engine till 2010. The US Navy has already received more than 700 engines.

Features
The F141 delivers 22,000 pounds of thrust, which is 35% more power than the F404. It is also more maintenance friendly and equipped with a Full Authority Digital Electronic Control (FADEC) computer.

The F414-GE-100 has a 3-stage fan, 7-stage compressor, annular type combustion chamber, 1-stage high pressure turbine, 1-stage low pressure turbine, afterburner and a variable geometric nozzle.
Numbers Support with Information Advertisements Sources Disclaimer Contact
Copyright © Worldwide-Military.com     best view by 1024 x 768 pixels

Last updated: August 16, 2010